Category Archives: Book and film reviews

Ha Jin’s War Trash upends everything economists thought they knew about war and conflict

Well, possibly it does not, but Ha Jin’s War Trash is one very good war novel. Apparently based on the experiences of his father in the Korean War (and it is fascinating to search for the real historical events described … Continue reading

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Jill Lepore on Rachel Carson in The New Yorker, March 2018

A fantastic writer paying homage, so gracefully, to a writer of another generation. Lepore uncovers for the modern reader enough about Carson’s life, but mostly about her writings on the sea (as opposed to her more well-known book on DDT) … Continue reading

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Camille Bordas short story “The State of Nature” in The New Yorker

I was flummoxed by Camille Bordas short story “The State of Nature” in April 9 2018 The New Yorker. It is clearly a very formal exercise. There is something about the syntax or the paragraph construction that could be understood … Continue reading

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Wonderful. I want to watch 2001 again now.

Wait, I thought, the broken wine glass! Or could it be a water glass? At any rate, it is one of the movie’s more famous riddles. The moment is so deliberate and messy and startling — the hotel sequence is … Continue reading

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Makala, documentary by Emmanuel Gras

Follows a charcoal maker, Kabwita, through several months of arduous physical labor. The Guardian has no idea what to make of it. Great for teaching.

Posted in Book and film reviews, Development thinking

Recent reading…

La Tabla Esmeralda, by Carla Montero. I wanted to read a big fat novel in Spanish, and this one certainly did the trick.  A rehash of Possession. Vie et ensignement de Tierno Bokar, by Amadou Hampate Ba. Tremendously interesting short … Continue reading

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Dear Etranger…. Japanese movie on Air France flight

This movie was so intimate and painful to watch finally I gave up and turned it off. Despite a career spanning nearly three decades, Yukiko Mishima hasn’t appeared on many lists of up-and-coming Japanese female directors, mine included. One reason: … Continue reading

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