Category Archives: Development thinking

Did capitalism reduce global poverty?

You will find that questions being asked, rhetorically, all over the Internet and especially academic Twitter. I think many people conflate “recent small policy change towards market liberalization” with capitalism. What is missing in these discussions is an agreed upon … Continue reading

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Sad television on situation in Arua, Uganda

No charges, tortured and beaten, and possibly disappeared. Justice in its most elementary form. Listen the the lawyers at about 22:00.

Posted in Development thinking

Great quote from Teju Cole, “Every Day is for the Thief” about markets!

“One goes to the market to participate in the world. As with all things that concern the world, being in the market requires caution. The market – the essence of the city – is always alive with possibility and danger. … Continue reading

Posted in Development thinking

A most disturbing finding about ethnicity in Kenya

Trickle-Down Ethnic Politics: Drunk and Absent in the Kenya Police Force (1957-1970) Oliver Vanden Eynde, Patrick M. Kuhn and Alexander Moradi  American Economic Journal: Economic Policy Vol. 10, Issue 3 — August 2018 How does ethnic politics affect the state’s … Continue reading

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My Dad sends me to a Nigerian comedy web site… pretty good!

Posted in Development thinking

Slavery and the slave trade was so complicated… 3 years as slaves in Suriname and then back to the Gold Coast

In May of 1746, slaving captain Christiaan Hagerop illegally captured ten Gold Coast canoe paddlers, seven of whom were free Africans from Elmina and Fante. Hagerop subsequently sailed to Suriname, where he sold the paddlers into slavery. To appease the … Continue reading

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Climate change may be responsible for die-off of world’s oldest baobab trees

The largest baobabs have largely stood alone, bearing witness to history. Radiocarbon dating shows the oldest of these stout-trunked savannah trees have lived for upwards of 2,500 years, surviving the birth of Jesus, the Renaissance, two world wars, and the … Continue reading

Posted in Development thinking